Ceylon Cinnamon Or Cassia- Is There A Difference?

cinamonWhat is the difference between CEYLON CINNAMON and CASSIA?

We know they come from two different plants and we know many, if not most companies provide cassia, calling it cinnamon because it is so similar that most people don’t know the difference. We feel it is not especially important unless you are consuming a large amount in order to obtain a particular health benefit- then it would no doubt matter. We would like to share with you an interesting health food site provided by one of our readers. The George Mateljan Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or advertising, is a new force for change to help make a healthier you and a healthier world. One of their articles is on this very subject: 

What is the difference between real cinnamon and cassia? 

Although related, cinnamon and cassia are not obtained from the same plant. They should be treated as separate foods, both from a nutritional and a health standpoint.

Scientifically speaking, there is only one true cinnamon, which is most commonly called “Ceylon cinnamon,” and comes from the plant Cinnamomum zeylanicum. An alternative scientific name for Ceylon cinnamon is Cinnamomum verum, which simply translates as “true cinnamon.”

The term “cassia” never refers to Ceylon cinnamon but rather to other species of cinnamon, including Cinnamomum cassia (alternatively called Cinnamomum aromaticaum) and Cinnamomum burmannii. While most simply referred to as “cassia,” you’ll often find Cinnamomum aromaticaum being referred to as “Chinese cinnamon” or “Saigon cinnamon,” and you’ll find Cinnamomum burmannii being called “Java cinnamon” or “Padang cassia.”

Ceylon cinnamon is typically more expensive than any of the cassia versions, and it is also the cinnamon more closely associated with potential health benefits involving blood sugar regulation. However, since both forms belong not only to the same family of plants (Lauraceae, the laurel family) but also to the same genus (Cinnamomum). They share many characteristics, and in some studies on rats and mice, the cassia cinnamons have shown blood sugar regulating ability as well.

What true cinnamon and cassia do not have in common is their coumarin content. Coumarins are naturally occurring plant components that can have strong anticoagulant properties. Because our blood needs to maintain its ability to coagulate in times of injury, excessive intake of coumarins over a prolonged period of time can pose health risks. While the level of naturally occurring coumarins in Ceylon cinnamon appears to be very small and lower than the amount that could cause health risks, the level of naturally occurring coumarins in the cassia cinnamons appears to be higher and may pose a risk to some individuals if consumed in substantial amounts on a regular basis. For this reason, organizations like the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Berlin, Germany have recommended that large amounts of the cassia cinnamons be avoided.

Unfortunately, there is no way to tell the difference between cinnamon powders that have been made from Ceylon/true cinnamon versus the cassia cinnamons. If you are buying cinnamon powder to use in a recipe, we recommend purchasing a cinnamon product that identifies the source of its cinnamon or calling the manufacturer to obtain this information.

In the case of stick cinnamon, however, there is one feature of the sticks you might want to look for in order to determine whether your cinnamon is true cinnamon or cassia cinnamon. That feature involves the texture of the sticks when you look downward at a stick so that you can see the end. When cinnamon sticks are rolled from the thick bark of the cassia plants, they look exactly as described – a one-piece, thick bark layer that does not show multiple layers of any kind. In the case of Ceylon cinnamon sticks (true cinnamon), since the plant bark is thinner, you may be able to see multiple layers of a thinner bark. That thinner layering of bark is one indication that your cinnamon sticks are made from true cinnamon. After finding true cinnamon sticks, of course, you can use a coffee grinder or a mortar and pestle to grind the sticks up into a powder.

When used in ordinary seasoning amounts occasionally in the diet, it is unlikely that you will face added health risks from the cassia cinnamons. We do not see a reason to avoid the cassia forms of this spice when consumed on this limited basis. However, if you are an avid cinnamon lover and likely to consume large amounts of cinnamon, we recommend Ceylon cinnamon (true cinnamon) as your best choice. Regardless of your Ceylon versus cassia decision, we always encourage you to purchase organic cinnamon, along with organic versions of all spices and seasonings.

Jeannie here– We have now checked out these cinnamon powders and feel we can highly recommend Kaina Organics not only for their high quality Ceylon cinnamon, but other spices as well.

Ceylon

TO YOUR GOOD HEALTH!

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About talknshare

My study of how to achieve and keep good health began when I was 18 and has been my lifelong passion. I have learned much over the years and when my T.O.P.S. group dissolved, I created Talk 'N Share. Life happened and I have not done anything with it until now. Since the beginning of this year I have learned many important things and wish to share with others, who like myself, may find it nearly impossible to lose those last few pounds and maintain the loss already achieved.
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2 Responses to Ceylon Cinnamon Or Cassia- Is There A Difference?

  1. Andrew Loechl says:

    Excellent!

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